PEANUT BUTTER COLLAGEN

Q: I have an allergy, is the collagen manufactured in a facility that contains allergens?

A: The line that the collagen is manufactured on is in a shared facility and on a shared line with all 8 major allergens. They have an allergen control program and specific cleaning and testing protocols to avoid allergen residues.

Q: What is monk fruit?

A: Also called Luo Han Guo, monk fruit comes from a Chinese plant cultivated for centuries by Buddhist monks. Much like stevia, it’s a delicious and natural way to sweeten without all the calories or sugar.

Q: What is konjac root?

A: Konjac is derived from the root of the konjac plant. It is a soluble and fermentable dietary fiber.

Q: What types of collagen does Collagen Fuel contain?

A: Our collagen includes Types 1 & 3 for hair, skin, and nail support.

Q: What is the best way to take collagen?

You can take it any time of day, on its own or with a meal. It can be mixed into hot or cold liquids or add to smoothies. You can also take it before or after workouts.

Q: How much caffeine is in your Chocolate Collagen Fuel?

A: A tablespoon of cocoa powder has about 12 milligrams of caffeine - not much, but it can affect an individual who is sensitive to it. One serving of Chocolate Collagen Fuel has even less than a tablespoon of cocoa powder, however, if it keeps you up, you may want to have your shakes earlier in the day.

Q: Is Collagen Fuel screened for heavy metals?

A: Our quality standards include testing each lot of collagen produced for compliance with regulatory standards for heavy metals.

Q: Are you Collagen Canisters BPA free?

A: Yes, our canisters and scoops are BPA free.

Q: What is the best way to take collagen?

A: You can take it any time of day, on its own or with a meal. It can be mixed into hot or cold liquids or add to smoothies. You can also take it before or after workouts. It is not intended as a meal replacement.

Keto Certification: Keepin’ it Keto Certified means keepin’ the carb count super specific based on standard, USDA-set serving guidelines. For meals, that means less than 10g of net carbohydrates per serving (12g for minimally processed foods or foods with reduced digestibility), 6g for snacks, and 2g per .5oz for condiments.


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